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Tag: Bloggers

The Winner’s Crime: An Interview with Marie Rutkoski

by Melissa
Author Q & A + YA Fiction / March 03, 2015

Today’s the day! To celebrate the release of The Winner’s Crime—the second book in Marie Rutkoski’s The Winner’s Trilogy—the fabulous Jenn from Lost in a Great Book has shared her interview with the lovely Marie Rutkoski. Read on for fun secrets behind The Winner’s Curse and The Winner’s Crime. (Caution! There are spoilers for The Winner's Curse, and possible vague spoilers for The Winner's Crime. You've been warned!)

In January I had the distinct pleasure of chatting via Skype with the ever-charming Marie Rutkoski, author of The Winner’s Curse and The Winner’s Crime books. After we had both settled in with our respective cups of tea (Marie’s was an intriguing blue tea from Mariage Frères that I have since attempted to order online), we focused our discussion on all things Kestrel and Arin. Be warned: there are definitely spoilers for book one in this discussion, although I’ve tried to edit out the spoilers for book two.

J: So, I’ve finished book two, and I just have to ask … Are you trying to kill us with this book? I’ll bet you wrote that last chapter with an evil laugh!

M: Ha! I mean… Okay, is this going to be public?

J: It will, but I will edit for book two spoilers, don’t you worry!

M: Oh good, that makes things easier. Well, after I wrote the first book, and I ended it the way that I did, which felt like a true ending to me, it felt like the characters were true to who they are and how I had made them into, and this is what would happen to them. After I wrote that, however, I wondered what might happen to them and how the story would continue. One of the things I felt pretty strongly about was that the tension between Kestrel and her father, for example, could break things eventually, just because they are both so similar, but their goals are so extremely different. I knew that they loved each other but …

J: They really don’t know how to love each other, really.

M: Yes, that’s it. It’s very true.

J: There are events in this book that broke my heart, especially between Kestrel and her father.

M: He would definitely see her actions as a personal betrayal. Part of the reason he has been at war for so long is because he felt that he was building this great world, this empire for her, and in his mind, he knew she was capable of making it all hers. In book one, she tells him that she doesn’t want his life, and all of her actions, even if she doesn’t mean them to be against him, he could take it that way.

J:  She is very much her father’s daughter in her analytical thought processes.

M:  She is, that’s true. I guess what I’m trying to say is that I didn’t set out to break reader’s hearts with the endings of the books, but rather that I see each book as an inevitable conclusion. I did think that it would be interesting to write a book where readers feel that the books is about a certain romantic relationship, but that they also realize that there are so many other relationships that happen that are just as crucial, and end up having as much, if not more, of an emotional impact.

J: Your characters are not one-dimensional; Kestrel is genuinely hurt and abandoned in this book because she has lost everyone close to her in book one. Jess, Ronan, her father … there is so much more to her than just her relationship with Arin, and I found she really came into her own in book two. Book one was so much about figuring out the world, and I found book two was very much a character book. There is still lots of action, but so much of what happens is internal.

I also found it interesting to see how Kestrel and Arin developed and have almost changed roles. In book one, Arin is the enigma as we don’t have much from his point of view because he is hiding his role in the rebellion, while Kestrel is the more open of the pair.

M: That’s a really interesting comment. I was definitely aware that Arin was not a very outgoing character; even in his point of view, we don’t get a lot from him in the first book and that’s very deliberate. I thought of him as a character that does not want to share, so anything he does share is done so grudgingly, but in the second book he does open up more. I hadn’t really thought about the fact that Kestrel would have to keep things much more close to her chest with everyone around her, but I guess she is much more secretive than she was before.

J: In book two, there are some interesting scenes involving a particular moth. Do those chameleon moths exist?

M: Oh, thanks! Well the book is technically fantasy, because of the different world, but I didn’t want it to be fantastical. I love fantasy, but for this book I really wanted to focus on the human – relationship, scenery, etc. I did want to lend little touches to remind the reader that this was not our world. The moths were convenient to me, for various reasons – plot-wise, events…

J: For ….. reasons that will become apparent after release!

M: Yes, exactly! So those, and the dragonflies that appear in the East … when I tend to try to remind the reader that this is a new and different world, it usually comes out in nature somehow. There may be something different, like green storms in the first book, and the crops in the second book.

J: Let’s talk a little about some of the non-story aspects of the book.The Winner’s Curse is so named because the economic theory of, essentially, paying more for something than it’s actually worth at auction. Is there a similar meaning for The Winner’s Crime?

M: The Winner’s Crime doesn’t have as serious a meaning; when you write a trilogy you want the names to go together and have some fluidity to them (example: Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Dreams of Gods and Monsters). I wanted to have some kind of cohesion with the first book, and I knew what the second book would be about.

J: What are you hoping people will get from book two?

M: Well, I have had to make a lot of apologies to people on Twitter – “You broke my heart!” “I’m sorry!”

In book one, Kestrel seems kind of unassailable, she’s the girl with all the answers, so I’m hoping in book two you see her much more vulnerable than before. I also think, as a writer, it was really satisfying to write more from Arin’s point of view. That happens a lot in book three as well.

They both grow a lot in these books.

If you’re interested in reading the rest of Jenn’s interview with Marie (or if you want more information on torture and book 3) click here!

I want to extend a huge thank you to Jenn for sharing her interview with us, and to the wonderful Marie Rutkoski for an intriguing behind-the-scenes look into The Winner’s Crime. Be sure to purchase your copy of The Winner’s Crime, in stores today!


Teens Read Spring Preview

by Megan
December 08, 2014

Last Saturday, we met in person (and virtually) with a crack team of caffeinated bloggers for a sneak peek at some amazing YA titles on the horizon for Spring 2015. Several (most) of us present likely hadn’t started our Christmas shopping, but the amount of excitement on hand for these Spring titles months away still put any holiday concerns to shame. There were treats, squeals, and overall giddy anticipation. Here are some of the highlights...

 

Title that elicited the biggest freakout:

Fairest by Marisa Meyer

There was a genuine Fairest freakout when we discussed this title; stampede for the book is imminent.

 

Science Fiction/Fantasy titles that elicited tribute volunteers in exchange for ARCs:

Ice Kissed by Amanda Hocking

The Novice by Taran Matharu

Becoming Jinn by Lori Goldstein

The Heart of Betrayal by Mary E. Pearson

Public Enemies by Ann Aguirre

Bell Weather by Dennis Mahoney

 

Titles that caused spontaneous shrieks/squeals of excitement:

From the Notebooks of a Middle-School Princess by Meg Cabot

Elena Vanishing by Elena Dunkle & Clare Dunkle

Joyride by Anna Banks

One Thing Stolen by Beth Kephart (THAT COVER!)

The Revelation of Louisa May (book nerds + bookish historical themes = !!!!!)

Sweet by Emmy Laybourne

Devoted by Jennifer Mathieu

Love Fortunes and Other Disasters by Kimberly Karalius

Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn

Weightless by Sarah Bannan

 

Titles that generated the most spontaneous singing:

Jesse’s Girl by Miranda Kenneally (Go ahead. Try not to burst into song with this one.)

The Heartbreakers by Ali Novak

 

Titles with the most maple-syrup covered Canuck love:

Some Kind of Normal by Juliana Stone

The Truth About Us by Janet Gurtler

SuperMutant Magic Academy by Jillian Tamaki

Lola Carlyle’s 12-Step Romance by Danielle Younge-Ullman

 

Thrillers, horror, and other heart-rate-increasing titles that left some presenters (Melissa, I’m looking at you) feeling a little faint:

The Forgetting by Nicole Maggi

The Escape by Hannah Jayne

The Suffering by Rin Chupeco

Gone Too Far by Natalie D. Richards

 

To check out all the action from the preview, follow the #TeensReadFeed hashtag on Twitter, and let us know the books you can't wait for!

Our beloved bloggers! Full of treats, coffee, and wielding goodie bags: