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Category: History

28 New Rep Picks For Spring 2019

by James
Animals & Nature + Biography & Memoir + Current Affairs + Fiction + Mysteries and Thrillers + Science Fiction and Fantasy + Food & Drink + Health & Wellness + History + Kids + Music + Parenting + Picture Books + Psychology & Self-Help + Travel + YA Fiction / February 21, 2019



Spring is coming right around the corner, and to celebrate the new season, here are some fantastic book recommendations from our sales reps! Happy reading!
 

Books for Adults
 

The Collected Schizophrenias
by Esmé Weijun Wang

"This book is a fascinating exploration of mental illness, from an author who has been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Wang’s essays are both touchingly personal and a journey through the history of mental illness and its diagnosis. Intimate, empathetic, and full of insight, this book is a must read!"
—Ali Hewitt
 

Women Rowing North
by Mary Pipher

"In Reviving Ophelia, Mary Pipher helped generations of girls and their parents navigate the choppy waters of adolescence. In Women Rowing North, she is examining the challenges and cultural issues women face as they age and offers a guide to wisdom, authenticity and bliss. There is a huge market of women looking for advice and support and Pipher is perfectly placed to offer it."
—Judy Parker


A Deadly Divide
by Ausma Zehanat Khan

"In this gripping new mystery, Detectives Khattak and Getty investigate a shooting at a mosque in Quebec City that looks like a hate crime."
—Laureen Cusack


The Little Island Bake Shop
by Jana Roerick

"I love Jana’s baking and am so happy to have her recipes!!!"
—Saffron Beckwith


Queen Bey

by Veronica Chambers

"In addition to being a record-breaking artist, Beyonce is a business woman, mother, daughter, sister, wife, black feminist and most importantly, one of the greatest stars of our time."
—Jessica Price


Rupture
by Ragnar Jonasson



"Fourth in Ragnar Jonasson’s Icelandic thriller series, starring detective Ari Thor. If you are fan of Nordic Noir, or not, read this dark atmospheric mystery, packed with fabulous scenery, quirky characters and a strong plot-driven story."
—Karen Stacey


Kid Gloves
by Lucy Knisley



"I really “relished” Lucy’s first book about her lifelong relationship with food and I can’t wait for her new graphic memoir about her difficulties conceiving and being pregnant. Lucy has been hyping this book’s “birth” with forty weeks of fun pregnancy facts on her Instagram, amidst (spoiler alert) photos of her super cute son!"
—Dani Farmer


She Explores
by Gale Straub



"In a time when people are choosing to spend money on travel and experiences over accumulating stuff, this book is perfect. Gorgeous travel photography with women’s personal stories of adventure and reflection—this book is the next best thing to actually spending time in the wild."
—Evette Sintichakis


Why You Like It

by Nolan Gasser

"This book explores the science and sociology behind why we fancy the sounds of our favourite musical artists. I love so many genres of music—what does that say about me?!"
—Laurie Martella


The Future Is Feminist
Edited by Mallory Farrugia

"Who run the world? FEMINISTS! A collection of brilliant essays by beloved feminist icons in one beautiful package. The perfect book for feminists of all ages."
—Laura MacDonald


Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions

Third Edition
by Gloria Steinem, foreword by Emma Watson

"Gloria Steinem’s timeless collection of feminist essays is back in a third edition with a new foreword by Emma Watson and new preface by Gloria Steinem herself! A worthy and essential addition to any feminist collection."
—Jenny Enriquez


Upon A Burning Throne
by Ashok K. Banker



"Ashok K. Banker, while not as well known in the West, is the founder of Indian fantasy fiction, similar to what Tolkien was for European literature. He has written more than 52 books, and has gained international following. Upon a Burning Throne is his latest title, featuring diverse characters, relentless action and an ongoing mystery sure to please all fantasy readers!"
—Louis-Marc Simard


Freedom from Anxious Thoughts and Feelings

by Scott Symington, PhD



"Anxiety is the most common mental health issue in Canada today, so any and all help is necessary! In Freedom from Anxious Thoughts and Feelings, Scott Symington introduces an incredibly simple concept to help us all redirect our thoughts back to what is happening in the present moment and move away from a life where we are ruled by our worries. Because everybody needs help sometimes."
—Morgen Young

 

Books for Kids
 

Tiny T. Rex and the Impossible Hug
By Jonathan Stutzman, illustrated by Jay Fleck



"It’s tough to give your friends hugs when your arms are so small, but Tiny T. Rex must find a way! This adorable picture book is the start of a new series starring this lovable dinosaur. I dare you not to fall in love with the plucky and charming Tiny T. Rex. I DARE YOU."
—Jenny Enriquez


A Friend for Henry
by Jenn Bailey, illustrated by Mika Song

"A Friend for Henry is a beautifully illustrated picture book told from the point of view of a child on the autism spectrum. The author gives us insight into Henry’s perspective, modeled after one of her sons on the spectrum. The touching and positive story will touch everyone’s hearts, children and adults alike!"
—Louis-Marc Simard

Voices
by David Elliott



"An extraordinary retelling and exploration of how Joan of Arc changed the course of history! In this age of the Throne of Glass, Divergent and the Hunger Games series, what better time to reintroduce the original kick ass female heroine? A novel told in verse, Voices is also perfect for fans of The Song of Achilles and Circe. Sure to be a hit with readers of teen fiction as well as teachers and librarians."
— Morgen Young

Comics Will Break Your Heart
by Faith Erin Hicks



"A sweet, funny contemporary teen romance for the inner geek in all of us."
— Saffron Beckwith


Fox & Chick: The Quiet Boat Ride
by Sergio Ruzzier

"In the classic canon of buddy books, Fox and Chick set out on a boating adventure—one an enthusiastic sailor and the other a landlubber who hates to miss out on any adventure. Told in three parts this hybrid of an early reader and picture book, illustrated in a comic book style, will be a hit for emerging and reluctant readers alike."
—Lorna MacDonald

The Mystery of Black Hollow Lane
by Julia Nobel



"Emmy’s time at a prestigious boarding school uncovers a secret society that may have played a part in her father’s disappearance."
—Laureen Cusack


The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost, illustrated by Vivian Mineker



"Robert Frost’s beloved poem is as thought-provoking and beautiful as ever in this picture book! The imaginative interpretation of the classic poem will speak to readers of all ages. This would make a great gift to anyone facing one of life’s many transitions."
—Evette Sintichakis


The Similars
by Rebecca Hanover

"Debut author Rebecca Hanover writes a real page-turner, sci-fi YA novel filled with tension and a thrilling story of six clones who enroll at a prestigious boarding school alongside their originals. Things can only get complicated."
—Laurie Martella

Games on the Go

by Lonely Planet

"Train, plane, boat, car, no matter how you are traveling, these games will keep boredom at bay. A must pack addition for any family trip, big or small!"
—Jessica Price


Fly Girls: Young Readers’ Edition
by Keith O’Brien

"20th century aviation history from the female pilots’ perspective. This is the story of the women pilots who joined the “boys” in the very popular sport of plane racing in the 1920s and ‘30s. A fascinating story of young women determined not to be denied their place in history. Just as Beryl Markham should be read by all young girls, so too should this book. For all those who loved Hidden Figures, here is a story of courageous liberated women ahead of their time."
—Karen Stacey


You Are New
by Lucy Knisley

"Being a new human is hard work! There are so many things to learn and taste and see. Then, just when you think you’ve got a handle on this “being” thing, you grow and there are a bunch of new things to learn! Good thing rhyming text and adorable illustrations from Lucy Knisley are here to provide a guide. Check out the page with the cat-hug… it’s my favourite."
—Dani Farmer

My Brother Otto
by Meg Raby, illustrated by Elisa Pallmer



"A little something for the siblings of the neurodiverse! As the younger sister of someone with developmental delays and disabilities, I would have LOVED a book like this when I was a kid—and I think my parents would have appreciated it too. My sibling does things their own way, maybe I understand them, maybe I don’t, but that’s okay! I love it!!"
—Laura MacDonald


The Little Guys
by Vera Brosgol



"Graphic novelist Vera Brosgol has written another subversively funny picture book. As a graphic novelist, her storytelling ability is stellar and her illustrations are perfectly matched to this story of the rampaging little guys. The message of uniting the community is subtle and doesn’t take away from the fun of the read aloud."
—Judy Parker


Brave Molly
by Brooke Boynton-Hughes



"In this panelled, wordless picture book, our heroine has to defeat the monsters of anxiety that follow her around. After trying to run from the shadowy monsters, Molly bravely confronts her anxiety and makes a friend, with the help of a good book. Author/illustrator Brooke Boynton-Hughes’ drawings do a wonderful job of capturing the fear of rejection, and the joy of a new friend we all feel."
—Ali Hewitt


 


Our Top 30 Book Covers of 2015

by Brooke
Fiction + Food & Drink + History + Kids / December 10, 2015

 

Take a look at some of our favourite cover designs from the last year!

 

The Girl With the Nine Wigs
by Sophie van der Stap
St. Martin's Press
 

The Man Who Couldn't Stop
by David Adam
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

A Manual for Cleaning Women
by Lucia Berlin
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

All That Followed
by Gabriel Urza
Henry Holt & Co

 

The Sellout
by Paul Beatty
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

Withces of America
by Alex Mar
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

Gamelife
by Michael W. Clune
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

KL
by Nikolaus Wachsmann
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

Home Is Burning
by Dan Marshall
Flatiron Books

 

Jesus' Son
by Denis Johnson
Picador

 

Art and Fashion
by E.P. Cutler and Julien Tomasello
Chronicle Books

 

Wilberforce
by H. S. Cross
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

Cancer Ward
by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

The Way Things Were
by Aatish Taseer
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

Find Me
by Laura van den Berg
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac
by Sharma Shields
Henry Holt & Co

 

Radiance
by Catherynne M. Valente
Tor

 

A Poet of the Invisible World
by Michael Golding
Picador

 

Love Fortunes and Other Disasters
by Kimberly Karalius
Feiwel and Friends

 

A Darker Shade of Magic
by V. E. Schwab
Tor

 

Furiously Happy
by Jenny Lawson
Flatiron Books

 

The Big Green Tent
by Polly Gannon
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

The Unfortunates
by Sophie McManus
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

One Thing Stolen
by Beth Kephart
Chronicle Books

 

The Big Trip
Lonely Planet

 

The Wake
by Paul Kingsnorth
Graywolf Press

 

Six of Crows
by Leigh Bardugo
Henry Holt & Co

 

One Thousand Things Worth Knowing
by Paul Muldoon
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

 

Book
by David W. Miles, illustrated by Natalie Hoopes
Familius

 

Tesla: a Portrait with Masks
Vladimir Pistalo
Graywolf Press

 


Canada Day Must-Haves

by Alisha
Fiction + Food & Drink + History + Kids / June 26, 2015

Canada Day Must-Haves

What better way to celebrate Canada's birthday than with some homegrown books? Check out this list of some of our faves, eh!

 

For the historian: War Plan Red

War Plan Red

 

For the creative kid: Canada Doodles

Canada Doodles

 

For the trivia star: Uncle John's Bathroom Reader Weird Canada

Weird Canada

 

For the BBQ-loving foodie: Grilling with House of Q

Grilling with House of Q

 

For the lit lover: Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables

 

For the softie: Winnie

Winnie


New Releases: February 2015 Highlights

by Dan
Art & Photography + Fiction + History + News + Psychology & Self-Help / January 21, 2015

February brings new books from Kristin Hannah, X-Files star David Duchovny, Jeffrey Archer, Scott McCloud, Richard Price (writing Harry Brandt), and more... Here are some of the highlights available from Raincoast Books next month..

FICTION

HISTORICAL

★ ★ FEBRUARY 2015 INDIE NEXT #1 PICK! ★ ★

The Nightingale

Kristin Hannah

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author comes an epic novel of love and war, spanning from the 1940s to the present day, and the secret lives of those who live in a small French town.

With courage, grace and powerful insight, bestselling author Kristin Hannah captures the epic panorama of WWII and illuminates an intimate part of history seldom seen: the women's war. The Nightingale tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love, and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France.

"This moving, emotional tribute to the brave women who fought behind enemy lines during the war is bound to gain the already immensely popular Hannah an even wider audience."—Booklist (starred review)

Available February 3


HUMOUROUS

Holy Cow

A Modern-Day Dairy Tale

David Duchovny

A rollicking, globe-trotting adventure with a twist: a four-legged heroine you won't soon forget.

Elsie Bovary is a cow, and a pretty happy one at that-her long, lazy days are spent eating, napping, and chatting with her best friend, Mallory. One night, Elsie and Mallory sneak out of their pasture; but while Mallory is interested in flirting with the neighbouring bulls, Elsie finds herself drawn to the farmhouse. Through the window, she sees the farmer's family gathered around a bright Box God-and what the Box God reveals about something called an "industrial meatfarm" shakes Elsie's understanding of her world to its core...

"Between the book’s sly humor, gently humanist (animalist?) message and wry illustrations by Natalya Balnova, this is a pseudo–children's book that smart adults should greatly enjoy."—Kirkus Reviews(starred review)

 


Available February 3


THRILLERS

Last Days of the Condor

James Grady

The Condor returns in this sequel to James Grady's bestselling Six Days of the Condor and Shadow of the Condor

Last Days of the Condor is the bullet-paced, ticking clock saga of America on the edge of our most startling spy world revolution since 9/11. Set in the savage streets and Kafkaesque corridors of Washington, DC, shot through with sex and suspense, with secret agent tradecraft and full-speed action, with hunters and the hunted, Last Days of the Condor is a breakneck saga of America's secrets from muckraking investigative reporter and author James Grady.

"Grady's anti-heroic spy returns in fine form in an up-to-the-minute novel to which the author, a former Washington investigator, brings plenty of insider knowledge."—Kirkus  Reviews

Available February 17


The Whites

Richard Price writing as Harry Brandt

The Whites is the electrifying debut of a new master of American crime fiction, Harry Brandt—the pen name of novelist Richard Price.

Richard Price, one of America’s most gifted novelists, has always written brilliantly about cops, criminals, and New York City. Now, writing as Harry Brandt, he is poised to win a huge following among all those who hunger for first-rate crime fiction.

 


  

"Price (Lush Life) is one whale of a storyteller by any name, as evinced by the debut of his new brand—okay, Brandt—a gripping, gritty, Greek tragedy of cops, killers, and the sometimes-blurry line between them."—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"a strong contender for best crime novel of 2015."—Booklist (starred review)

In the wake of rage and sorrow, ordinary people respond by going crazy and screwing up. In this far-from-ordinary novel, Price/Brandt explores the hows and whys. Fasten your seat belt."—Kirkus Reviews 

Available February 17


SUSPENSE

Mightier Than the Sword

Jeffrey Archer

The next breathtaking installment in Jeffrey Archer's New York Times and #1 internationally bestselling Clifton Chronicles series carries the Clifton family into the late 1960s.

Jeffrey Archer's compelling Clifton Chronicles continue in this, his most accomplished novel to date. With all the trademark twists and turns that have made him one of the world's most popular authors, the spellbinding story of the Clifton and the Barrington families continues.

 

Available February 24


FANTASY

A Darker Shade of Magic

V. E. Schwab

Prepare to be dazzled by a world of parallel Londons—where magic thrives, starves, or lies forgotten, and where power can destroy just as quickly as it can create.

Kell is one of the last Travelers—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel universes—as such, he can choose where he lands.

There’s Grey London, dirty and boring, without any magic, with one mad king—George III. Red London, where life and magic are revered—and where Kell was raised alongside Rhys Maresh, the rougish heir to the throne. White London—a place where people fight to control magic, and the magic fights back, draining the city to its very bones. And once upon a time, there was Black London...but no one speaks of that now....

"Confident prose and marvelous touches—a chameleon coat, a scarlet river of magic, a piratical antiheroine—bring exuberant life to an exhilarating adventure among the worlds."—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Fantasy fans will love this fast-paced adventure, with its complex magic system, thoughtful hero and bold heroine."Kirkus Reviews

Available February 24


GRAPHICA

The Sculptor

Scott McCloud

The long-awaited magnum opus from comics superstar Scott McCloud: a spellbinding adult urban fable about a wish, a deal with Death, the price of art, and the value of life.

David Smith is giving his life for his art—literally. Thanks to a deal with Death, the young sculptor gets his childhood wish: to sculpt anything he can imagine with his bare hands. But now that he only has 200 days to live, deciding what to create is harder than he thought, and discovering the love of his life at the eleventh hour isn't making it any easier! 

"Drawn in sharp, sure-handed lines that jump from intimate blocks of wry but poignant interactions with other characters to dramatically realized city scenery, McCloud's epic generates magic and makes an early play for graphic novel of the year."—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"The fluidity of McCloud’s visual narrative carries us along with a sweep impossible to duplicate in prose, and, through to its climax, the story’s commitment to its harsh, inevitable, but ultimately sublime outcome qualifies this as a work of stunning, timeless graphic literature."Booklist (starred review)

Available February 3


NONFICTION

HISTORY

A Kim Jong-Il Production

The Extraordinary True Story of a Kidnapped Filmmaker, His Star Actress, and a Young Dictator's Rise to Power

Paul Fischer

The Orphan Master’s Son meets Argo in the extraordinary true story of Kim Jong-Il’s 1978 kidnapping of the golden couple of South Korean cinema, the movies they made, and their escape.

A nonfiction thriller packed with tension, passion, and politics, author Paul Fischer's A Kim Jong-Il Production offers a rare glimpse into a secretive world, illuminating a fascinating chapter of North Korea's history that helps explain how it became the hermetically sealed, intensely stage-managed country it remains today.

"A meticulously detailed feat of rare footage inside the DPRK’s propaganda machinery."Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Fischer’s entertaining narrative paints an arresting portrait of a North Korean 'theater state,' forced to enact the demented script of a sociopathic tyrant."—Publishers Weekly

Available February 3


RELIGION

Finding Jesus: Faith. Fact. Forgery

Six Holy Objects That Tell the Remarkable Story of the Gospels

David Gibson and Michael McKinley

A companion book to CNN’s six-night, six-hour primetime television series that takes viewers on a forensic and archaeological journey through the Bible.

Finding Jesus explores six major artefacts, including the Shroud of Turin, the True Cross, and John the Baptist, that give us the most direct evidence about the life and world of Jesus. The book and attendant CNN series provide a dramatic way to retell "the greatest story ever told" while introducing a broad audience to the history, the latest controversies, and newest forensic science involved in sorting out facts from the fiction of would-be forgers and deceivers.

Available February 24


SELF-HELP

The Fear Cure 

Cultivating Courage as Medicine for the Body, Mind, and Soul

Lissa Rankin, M.D.

Not many people in the medical world are talking about how being afraid can make us sick—but the truth is that fear, left untreated, becomes a serious risk factor for conditions from heart disease to diabetes to cancer. Now Lissa Rankin, M.D., explains why we need to heal ourselves from the fear that puts our health at risk and robs our lives of joy—and shows us how fear can ultimately cure us by opening our eyes to all that needs healing in our lives.

Available February 24


Soul Shifts

Transformative Wisdom for Creating a Life of Authentic Awakening, Emotional Freedom & Practical Spirituality

Barbara De Angelis

Soul Shifts is the ground-breaking new book from New York Times best-selling author and renowned transformational teacher Barbara De Angelis, Ph.D. Now, in her most powerful offering yet—and the culmination of her life's work—Dr. De Angelis offers a practical handbook for awakening, and a brilliant re-envisioning of the journey of personal and spiritual transformation that will inspire and enlighten long-time seekers as well as new arrivals to the path of growth.

Available February 24


Goddesses Never Age 

The Secret Prescription for Radiance, Vitality, and Well-Being

Christiane Northrup, M.D.

Though we talk about wanting to "age gracefully," the truth is that when it comes to getting older, we're programmed to dread an inevitable decline: in our health, our looks, our sexual relationships, even the pleasure we take in living life. But as Christiane Northrup, M.D., shows us in this profoundly empowering book, we have it in us to make growing older an entirely different experience, for both our bodies and our souls. In chapters that blend personal stories and practical exercises with the latest research on health and ageing, Dr. Northrup lays out the principles of ageless living, from rejecting processed foods to releasing stuck emotions, from embracing our sensuality to connecting deeply with our Divine Source.

Available February 24


ART & PHOTOGRAPHY

life.love.beauty

Keegan Allen

A rich visual and literary tour of the international star's personal experiences, observations, travels, passions and aspirations.

Keegan Allen is currently known to fans of the ABC Family hit television series, Pretty Little Liars. He has also appeared in numerous independent films and made his New York Stage debut in the acclaimed MCC production of Small Engine Repair. Keegan was given his first camera at age nine, and began a lifelong study and pursuit of photography. life.love.beauty is a selection of photographs taken since his childhood. 

Available February 3


104 Things to Paint

In the spirit of the bestseller 642 Things to Draw, this guided painting book is filled with fun ideas that will have artists of all skill levels reaching for their paintbrushes. Covering everything from the straightforward (a color wheel) to the curiously quirky (a hot mess)—and with extra-thick textured pages that make it easy to paint directly inside the book—this is the perfect inspirational on-the-go art studio for beginning and seasoned painters alike.

 

Available February 17


My Favourite Book of 2014, Jamie Broadhurst

by Jamie
History / December 11, 2014

Orlando Figes had me at the opening sentence of Revolutionary Russia 1891-1991: A History,My aim is to provide a brief account of the Russian Revolution in the longue durée, to chart one hundred years of history as a single revolutionary cycle.”

This takes me right back to my happiest days at school reading French medieval social history and Soviet politics. The longue durée is a style of historiography that tries to show that history happens at a deeper social, material and environmental level than a purely political narrative can capture. A lot of these types of books are massive, this is not a big book in the traditional sense. Revolutionary Russia is a beautifully written work of historical concision; precise and clipped but never feeling rushed. It is a literary work that befits a recipient of the Wolfson History Prize. His writing stimulates all sorts of fresh questions and opens up vistas into the deeply tragic Soviet experience from which the reader can think about more deeply. I wish I had this excellent book in school.  It is the best single volume on Soviet history I have ever read.

Figes picks his details like novelist. Like for example, the night of the October insurrection when the Lenin is smuggled back in Petrograd but is stopped by a policeman—he is not recognized and is allowed to pass, and rushes off to bully the Central Committee into launching the October revolution. A great “What If? “ question of history. And the torture techniques of the Red Terror during the Civil War in places read likes pages out of 1984 and Room 101: what is with police states and torture by rabid rats eating flesh? Or the social mobility caused by Stalin’s purges where young apparatchiks took the job titles and prestige of their seniors who were dragged off to the Gulag. The fact that Brezhnev and Khrushchev were both promoted off the factory floor in 1928 in the wake of their immediate party superiors being arrested personalizes the argument about the social basis of Stalinism in a way I hadn’t thought about before.

Soviet foreign policy also comes into sharper relief. That Castro and Cuba voluntarily chose Communism led the Kremlin to remember too fondly the lost opportunity of the suppressed Soviet uprisings of 1918 across Europe and to over play their hand in the Caribbean. This rings true to me for all countries are haunted by the spectre of the past success and failures (to misquote Marx). And the immense fortitude of the Soviet people to endure the unbearable comes across in almost every page; the slave labor used to dig the White Canal by hand in which tens of thousands died (and was used as PR triumph by the regime) or the great Patriotic War where the daily loss of life was double the Allied losses on D-Day. That is two D-Days every day for four years.

Revolutionary Russia came out earlier this year, just as Russia was pushing back into its traditional spheres of influence in Crimea and the Ukraine, acting on imperatives that would have been well understood by the Soviet regime. In doing so, the contours and control of the security state run by the former KGB officer Vladimir Putin have become ever more apparent. The last question then is whether Figes has been too optimistic in dating the end of the Revolution at 1991, perhaps the longue durée of Soviet history is longer than we suspected. 


New Releases: April 2014 Highlights

by Dan
Art & Photography + Fashion & Textiles + Fiction + History + Humour / March 11, 2014

Here's a sneak-peek at some of the new releases coming to bookstores in April (and be sure to check out our new books for kids and teens as well!)... 

FICTION

Short Stories 

Can't and Won't

Lydia Davis

A new collection of short stories from the woman Rick Moody has called "the best prose stylist in America."
 

In her fifth collection of stories, Lydia Davis writes with bracing candor and sly humor about the quotidian, revealing the mysterious, the foreign, the alienating, and the pleasurable within the predictable patterns of daily life.

 

 

"Five years after a mammoth, comprehensive collection of stories secured her literary legacy, this unique author explores new directions and blurs boundaries in writing that is always fresh and often funny."Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Davis’s bulletproof prose sends each story shooting off the page."Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Available April 8


Suspense

Keep Quiet

Lisa Scottoline

New York Times bestselling author Lisa Scottoline delivers a gripping new novel about family and justice.

Keep Quiet is an emotionally complex story about one man's split-second decision to protect his son— and the devastating consequences that follow.

 

 

 

 

 

"Scottoline keeps the tension high while portraying a family in turmoil. A heck of a twist ending wraps everything up...a satisfying and suspenseful read."—Booklist

"Scottoline brings tension to a boil in her latest novel. Her characters are believable, and her protagonist is sympathetic. This is an intriguing exploration of human frailties, justice and family relationships."—RT Reviews  

Available April 8


Fantasy

Dragon Age: The Masked Empire  

Patrick Weekes

Journey into the darkest and deadliest part of Orlais, where the weight of titles matters less than the strength of blades. In this thrilling tie-in to the award-winning Dragon Age™ games, alliances are forged and promises broken as Empress Celene and Grand Duke Gaspard battle for the throne. But in the end, the elves who hide in the forests or starve in the slums may decide the fate of the masked empire.

Available April 8

 


Thrillers / Crime

Blood Always Tells 

Hilary Davidson

Hilary Davidson returns with Blood Always Tells, a twisted tale of love, crime, and family gone wrong.

The Canadian-born Davidson is the award-winning author of The Damage Done and Evil in All Its Disguises.

 

 

 

 

 

"Davidson has penned an outstanding novel that entertains with its carefully plotted tale of kidnapping, murder and duplicity. Impressive from the outset, the surprises continue throughout until the clincher at the end. Her talent for character development shines as each person blends flawlessly into the story."—RT Reviews

"This could be the Gone Girl of 2014"—MysteryPeople

Available April 15


Literary

The Other Story 

Tatiana de Rosnay

From the author of Sarah's Key, an absorbing new novel about a young writer who, while digging into his family’s deeply buried secrets, finds the key to his future.

Page-turning, layered and beautifully written, The Other Story is a reflection on identity, the process of being a writer and the repercussions of generations-old decisions as they echo into the present and shape the future.

 

 

Available April 15


Literary

In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman

A bold, epic debut novel set during the war and financial crisis that defined the beginning of our century.

In the Light of What We Know takes us on a journey of exhilarating scope—from Kabul to London, New York, Islamabad, Oxford, and Princeton—and explores the great questions of love, belonging, science, and war. It is an age-old story: the friendship of two men and the betrayal of one by the other.  

 

 

"Beautifully written evidence that some of the most interesting writing in English is coming from the edges of old empires."Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"This formidable novel unpacks friendship, betrayal, unknowability – and includes an astute take on Englishness, on class, on mathematical theory, human rights, and whether people can trust their own perception of the world."The Observer (UK)

Available April 22


Science Fiction

Afterparty

Daryl Gregory

A mind-bending and violent chase across Canada and the US, Daryl Gregory's Afterparty is a marvelous mix of William Gibson's Neuromancer, Philip K. Dick's Ubik, and perhaps a bit of Peter Watts's Starfish: a last chance to save civilization, or die trying.

 

 

 

 

"Gregory dashes off his near-future story like a ‘chemjet’ printing out sheets of smart drugs…The tragi-comical satire dispenses with sermons and easy morals, preferring to be entertaining and thought-provoking instead."Publishers Weekly

Available April 22


Suspense

Live to See Tomorrow 

Iris Johansen

Catherine Ling is one of the CIA’s most prized operatives. Raised on the streets of Hong Kong, she was pulled into the agency at the age of fourteen. If life has taught her anything, it is not to get attached, but there are two exceptions to that rule: her son Luke and her mentor Hu Chang. Luke was kidnapped at age two, and now, nine years later, he has astonishingly been returned to her. Catherine vows never to fail him again. But when her job pulls her away from home, she relies on the brilliant and deadly Hu Chang to safeguard Luke in her absence...

Available April 29


NONFICTION

Literary Collections / Essays

The Empathy Exams

Essays

Leslie Jamison

From personal loss to phantom diseases, The Empathy Exams is a bold and brilliant collection of essays by Leslie Jamieson. The book is the winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize, and Publishers Weekly named it one of the best essay collections of Spring 2014

 

 

 

 

"Novelist Jamison’s... first collection of essays, winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize, is a heady and unsparing examination of pain and how it allows us to understand others, and ourselves."Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Available April 1


Travel

The World's Great Wonders

Jheni Osman

Go beyond the visual spectacle of the world's 50 greatest wonders, and discover what makes them such amazing places. With stunning images and expert illustrations, experience and appreciate the most famous sights on earth in an exciting new way.

 

 

Available April 1


Art / Popular Culture / Fashion

The WORN Archive 

Fashion Journal about the Art, Ideas, & History of What We Wear

Edited by Serah-Marie McMahon

The WORN Archive is a manifesto for fashion and clothing, featuring the best content from Worn Fashion Journal's first 14 issues. The articles, penned by a host of unique contributors, touch on topics as wide-ranging as feminism, hijabs, how to tie a tie, the history of flight attendants, and textile conservation. With eclectic photo shoots featuring 'real' models, striking illustrations, and whimsical layouts, every page is a joyful, creative approach to clothing.

Available April 1


Self-Help / Motivational & Inspirational

Miracles Now

108 Life-Changing Tools for Less Stress, More Flow, and Finding Your True Purpose

Gabrielle Bernstein

Most of us don't have time for an hour of yoga or 30 minutes of meditation every day. We're overwhelmed as it is. Our spiritual practice shouldn't add to that.

Gabrielle Bernstein has hand-picked 108 simple techniques to combat our most common problems-stress, burnout, frustration, jealousy, resentment. The stuff we have to deal with on a daily basis. This book is designed so that you can achieve peace and experience miracles now. 

 

Available April 8


Art / History

The Book of Trees

Visualizing Branches of Knowledge

Manuel Lima

Michael Lima's critically acclaimed bestseller Visual Complexity was the first in-depth examination of the burgeoning field of information visualization. In this new companion volume, The Book of Trees, data viz expert Lima examines the history of the tree diagram, from its roots in the illuminated manuscripts of medieval monasteries to its current resurgence as an elegant means of visualization.

Available April 8


Art / Canadian

Sister and I  in Alaska 

Emily Carr; edited by David A. Silcox

Full of humour and delight, with a playful text and whimsical full colour illustrations, Sister and I in Alaska documents Emily and Alice's trip to Skidegate, Juneau and places beyond, an adventure that proved seminal in the development of Carr as one of the foremost painters of the last century.

Available April 9


History / Military

War! What Is It Good For?

Conflict and the Progress of Civilization from Primates to Robots

Ian Morris

In War! What Is It Good For? renowned historian and archaeologist Ian Morris tells the gruesome, gripping story of fifteen thousand years of war, going beyond the battles and brutality to reveal what war has really done to and for the world. As Morris explains war has created bigger, more complex societies, ruled by governments that have stamped out internal violence. Strangely enough, killing has made the world safer and richer.

 

"A profoundly uncomfortable but provocative argument that “productive war” promotes greater safety, a decrease in violence and economic growth... A disturbing, transformative text that veers toward essential reading."Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Available April 15


Humour

Sh*t Rough Drafts

Pop Culture's Favorite Books, Movies, and TV Shows as They Might Have Been

Paul Laudiero

Sh*t Rough Drafts collects imagined misguided early drafts of classic books, screenplays, and contemporary literature, creating visions of alternate works that would exist had the authors not come to their senses. 

 

 

 
Available April 15

History / Europe

Hotel Florida

Truth, Love, and Death in the Spanish Civil War

Amanda Vaill

Madrid, 1936. In a city blasted by a civil war that many fear will cross borders and engulf Europe, six people meet and find their lives changed forever. Ernest Hemingway, his career stalled, his marriage sour, hopes that this war will give him fresh material and new romance; Martha Gellhorn, an ambitious novice journalist hungry for love and experience, thinks she will find both with Hemingway in Spain. Robert Capa and Gerda Taro, idealistic young photographers based in Paris, want to capture history in the making and are inventing modern photojournalism in the process. And Arturo Barea, chief of Madrid's loyalist foreign press office, and Ilsa Kulcsar, his Austrian deputy, are struggling to balance truth-telling with loyalty to their compromised cause—a struggle that places both of them in peril.

"War, sex, friendship, betrayal, celebrity, rivalry, jealousy, idealism, foolishness and foppery—all this and more gather in the lobby of Madrid’s Hotel Florida."Kirkus Reviews

"Beautifully told, Vaill’s story captures the timeless immediacy of warfront reporting with the universal struggle to stay in love, just before the Nazis permanently changed the European landscape."Publishers Weekly

Available April 22


History / Europe

Kind Mama

A Simple Guide to Supercharged Fertility, a Radiant Pregnancy, a Sweeter Birth, and a Healthier, More Beautiful Beginning

Alicia Silverstone

In The Kind Mama, Alicia Silverstone has created a comprehensive and practical guide empowering women to take charge of their fertility, pregnancy, and first 6 months with baby. She helps readers navigate everything from prenatal testing and birth plans to successful breastfeeding and creating a supportive "baby nest." The result is an authoritative, one-stop guide that empowers women to trust their instincts during this vital milestone, while helping them embark on a healthy and more vibrant path to motherhood.

 

Available April 22


Cooking / Health & Healing

The Family Cooks

100+ Recipes to Get Your Family Craving Food That's Simple, Tasty, and Incredibly Good for You

Laurie David; foreword by Katie Couric

In The Family Cooks, Laurie David inspires parents and kids to take control of what they eat by making it themselves. With her longtime collaborator, Kirstin Uhrenholdt, David offers more than 100 recipes that are simple, fast, "low in the bad stuff and high in the good stuff," and designed to bring kids into the cooking process.

Available April 22


House & Home / Decorating

Bright Bazaar

Embracing Color for Make-You-Smile Style

Will Taylor

Dive into a refreshing take on color from one of the world's leading interiors bloggers, Will Taylor of Bright.Bazaar: West Elm's "go-to blogger for color inspiration." What began as a popular blog attracting over 400,000 readers a month is now a gorgeous, colour-popping book sure to delight and inspire all.

 

 

Available April 29


Divine Vintage Toronto Launch

by Dan
Events + Food & Drink + History / November 14, 2012

 

Divine Vintage
Join authors Randall Heskett PhD and Joel Butler MW on Thursday, November 22 at 4:30 p.m. at the Toronto School of Theology to celebrate the launch of their new book Divine Vintage: Following the Wine Trail from Genesis to the Modern Age!
 
Divine Vintage explores the influence of wine on the evolution of human society through the lenses of historical fact and the interpretation of Biblical texts.
 

DIVINE VINTAGE Book Launch
Thursday, November 22, 2012

Toronto School of Theology

47 Queen's Park Crescent East Time: 4:30 p.m. 
Board Room 1 
Toronto, Ontario

With thanks to IWEG (Independent Wine Education Guild)

Download invitation (PDF)
RSVP


My Favourite Book of 2011: Jamie (Marketing)

by Jamie
History + Politics / December 22, 2011

Fernand Braudel once said that the study of the Middle Ages is very difficult because the eighteenth century gets in the way. So much of what we take for granted today, our habits unspoken assumptions, our mentalités, were shaped by the profound change that the eighteenth century brought. As a result the period before the 18th century feels impossibly foreign to us.

David Frum does something similar for contemporary culture and politics by excavating the shift in mentalités brought about by the nineteen seventies. He argues in How We Got Here: The 70's: The Decade That Brought You Modern Life—For Better or Worse that our current attitudes about authority, equality, work, ambition, sex and politics were shaped in the crucible decade of the nineteen seventies and the backlash that came after. The sixties are the glamour decade, but really the influential decade on a mass level is the seventies.

As a right-wing thinker Frum has an obvious agenda; he pines for world before the tumult of the seventies, and sees the Age of Jimmy Carter as the time when the Keynesian consensus finally snapped to be replaced by the ascendancy of the Right. But the book is no less enjoyable book for his politics. His politics are not mine, but he put forwards his position with such clarity and eloquence, it can only help me to sharpen my own thinking. And as a child of the seventies it is good fun to see my own personal attitudes and foibles historicized.

How We Got Here is neither our book nor a new book, but I heard an interview with Frum on CBC's Ideas a few months back and was struck by (a) CBC interviewing at length someone who sits so far outside the moderate consensus of Canadian conventional wisdom and (b) how well Frum speaks. I popped into central branch of the Vancouver Public Library and picked up a copy.

Public libraries are a great thing. My New Year’s resolution is to find myself in a library at least once a week all year. And for what it is worth, public expenditure on libraries in Canada peaked in the nineteen seventies. So it was far from a lost decade. 


Shakespearian conspiracy theories

by Natalia
Current Affairs + Film + History / October 31, 2011

I was pretty excited over the weekend to hear that Roland Emmerich's new movie Anonymous is out.  I love me a good Elizabethan costume drama—the clothes, the language, the political intrigue!  If you haven't heard of it, the film dramatizes the Oxfordian theory of authorship—the idea that Shakespeare's plays were written by Edward de Vere, the 17th earl of Oxford (who, as various people have pointed out, died several years before the publication of The Tempest).

The film has triggered a positively apoplectic response from the scholarly community; the New Yorker's David Denby calls it a story "so rotten that, as Shakespeare, or, rather, Oxford, might put it, the kites wheel and shriek rather than batten on so foul a carcass."

Personally, I find the authorship question rather silly—I prefer to read the plays for themselves rather than scan them Da Vinci Code-style for hidden clues to their composition.  And why fabricate conspiracy theories when so much historically accurate skulduggery exists?  If you like your Shakespeare spiced with criminal intrigue yet still backed up by rigorous scholarship, may I suggest:

The Shakespeare Thefts

 

Stealing the World's Most Famous Book


Click on the cover for more info!

Vancouver Then and Now Launch

by Danielle
Art & Photography + Events + History / August 10, 2010

Vancouver Then and Now juxtaposes seventy archival images of buildings and scenes with the same place as it is today, along with descriptive text for each photograph which includes historical and other details.

The archival images are from a variety of periods, but most date from 1890 to 1930. Most of the contemporary photographs are taken by Karl Mondon, often providing dramatic depictions of the changes that have taken place.

                                             Kitsilano Beach              

                         NOW                                                      THEN

PHOTO CREDIT:
Now: Karl Mondon
Then: City of Vancouver Archives

The book was published by Thunder Bay Press in California, and is part of
a series of books on the same theme.

Hope to see you there!!

 

 


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