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My Favourite Book of 2014, Jamie Broadhurst

by Jamie
History / December 11, 2014

Orlando Figes had me at the opening sentence of Revolutionary Russia 1891-1991: A History,My aim is to provide a brief account of the Russian Revolution in the longue durée, to chart one hundred years of history as a single revolutionary cycle.”

This takes me right back to my happiest days at school reading French medieval social history and Soviet politics. The longue durée is a style of historiography that tries to show that history happens at a deeper social, material and environmental level than a purely political narrative can capture. A lot of these types of books are massive, this is not a big book in the traditional sense. Revolutionary Russia is a beautifully written work of historical concision; precise and clipped but never feeling rushed. It is a literary work that befits a recipient of the Wolfson History Prize. His writing stimulates all sorts of fresh questions and opens up vistas into the deeply tragic Soviet experience from which the reader can think about more deeply. I wish I had this excellent book in school.  It is the best single volume on Soviet history I have ever read.

Figes picks his details like novelist. Like for example, the night of the October insurrection when the Lenin is smuggled back in Petrograd but is stopped by a policeman—he is not recognized and is allowed to pass, and rushes off to bully the Central Committee into launching the October revolution. A great “What If? “ question of history. And the torture techniques of the Red Terror during the Civil War in places read likes pages out of 1984 and Room 101: what is with police states and torture by rabid rats eating flesh? Or the social mobility caused by Stalin’s purges where young apparatchiks took the job titles and prestige of their seniors who were dragged off to the Gulag. The fact that Brezhnev and Khrushchev were both promoted off the factory floor in 1928 in the wake of their immediate party superiors being arrested personalizes the argument about the social basis of Stalinism in a way I hadn’t thought about before.

Soviet foreign policy also comes into sharper relief. That Castro and Cuba voluntarily chose Communism led the Kremlin to remember too fondly the lost opportunity of the suppressed Soviet uprisings of 1918 across Europe and to over play their hand in the Caribbean. This rings true to me for all countries are haunted by the spectre of the past success and failures (to misquote Marx). And the immense fortitude of the Soviet people to endure the unbearable comes across in almost every page; the slave labor used to dig the White Canal by hand in which tens of thousands died (and was used as PR triumph by the regime) or the great Patriotic War where the daily loss of life was double the Allied losses on D-Day. That is two D-Days every day for four years.

Revolutionary Russia came out earlier this year, just as Russia was pushing back into its traditional spheres of influence in Crimea and the Ukraine, acting on imperatives that would have been well understood by the Soviet regime. In doing so, the contours and control of the security state run by the former KGB officer Vladimir Putin have become ever more apparent. The last question then is whether Figes has been too optimistic in dating the end of the Revolution at 1991, perhaps the longue durée of Soviet history is longer than we suspected. 


My Favourite Book of 2014, Mark Penney

by Dan
Graphica / December 10, 2014

If you’ve seen Terrence Malick’s The Thin Red Line you’ll be well-prepared for what you’re getting into with Showa 1944-1953. The anti-war tone and island imagery are very similar; both tales also revolve around a central character whose positive experiences with native islanders contrast sharply with what they’re forced to endure fighting a short distance away.

I think that, like me, you too will be surprised when Shigeru Mizuki makes it out of the war alive (forgetting for a moment that there is a fourth volume coming that deals with events into the 1980s). It’s surprising that he survives not only physically, but also emotionally. If you’ve read the first two volumes, you know that Shigeru Mizuki’s possesses a unique sense of humour that is often expressed through his ravenous appetite and staggering capacity for punishment. That he didn’t lose his sense of humour or his life despite the severe mental and physical trials he went through is deeply affecting.
Mizuki’s escape from the war isn’t an escape from suffering. Postwar Japan was a hard place, and although Mizkui seems finally to have escaped regular beatings, his prodigious hunger rarely gets a break amid regular food shortages and frequent unemployment. Fishmongery will not contain Mizuki’s energies; running a boarding house merely provides an insecure launch pad into the world of professional art. We leave volume three with Mizuki poised for great accomplishment.

Showa 1953-1989 will be coming soon, but I really feel that Showa 1944-1953 is the heart of the story.

Mark Penney, Ampersand Inc
 


My Favourite Book of 2014, Chelsea Newcombe

by Chelsea
Kids / December 09, 2014

It was easy to choose my favourite book of 2014. I looked back over all of the books I encountered and thought, “Which one stuck with me? Who made me care enough to lose sleep?” Without a doubt it's Ann M. Martin’s Rain Reign¸ inspired by her personal experience with the aftermath of Hurricane Irene.

Growing up, I devoured a steady diet of The Babysitter’s Club, Martin’s blockbuster paperback series now synonymous with the ‘90s. But even though I read every single one in numbered order with an almost religious fanaticism, they might as well have been magazines for the lack of an impression that the stories or characters had on me. Fast-forward 20 years later and I’m reading Ann M. Martin’s writing again, but this time to a much different effect. Rain Reign made me laugh and cry, feel worried for and proud of our heroine Rose, and hug my dog a couple of times.

Rose is very unique; she’s obsessed with prime numbers and homonyms, a side effect of her high-functioning autism, which in turn makes school, friendships and her relationship with her father fraught with stress. Her uncle Weldon and adopted mutt Rain are the bright spots in her world. Rose’s dad found Rain behind the neighborhood bar, wandering lost without a collar with owners nowhere to be found (although he didn’t put much effort into the search); girl and dog are inseparable until a hurricane blows in, Rain becomes lost, and Rose has to challenge her core beliefs about right and wrong to get her dog back home. 


My Favourite Book of 2014, Dan Wagstaff

by Dan
Biography & Memoir / December 05, 2014

"There have been many books and articles that revel in describing exactly how grotesque and shameful the behaviour of alcoholic writers can be. That wasn't my intention. What I wanted was to discover how each of these men — and, along the way, some of the many others who'd suffered from the disease — experienced and thought about their addiction. If anything, it was an expression of my faith in literature and its power to map the more difficult regions of human experience and knowledge." 

Olivia Laing, The Trip to Echo Spring

 

As I spend almost every day with books and authors, I think I’m probably predisposed to find stories about writers and alcohol fascinating—it rather comes with the territory. But you don’t have to work in publishing to be hooked by The Trip to Echo Spring by Olivia Laing, you just have to love great writing. 

F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, John Berryman, John Cheever, and Raymond Carver were some of the greatest writers of the twentieth century. They were friends, allies, students, mentors and inspirations. They were also alcoholics. Booze defined their work and their everyday lives.

In The Trip to Echo Spring, Laing—who grew up in an alcoholic family herself—tries to get to grips with these men and their troubled relationship with alcohol by visiting the places they were closely associated with. As she criss-crosses the United States, slowly connecting the dots between them, it becomes a quest of sorts:

“I thought it might be possible to build a kind of topographical map of alcoholism, tracing its developing contours from the pleasures of intoxication through the gruelling realities of the drying-out process. As I worked across the country, passing back and forth between books and lives, I hoped I might come closer to understanding what alcohol addiction means, or at least to finding out what those who struggled with and were sometimes destroyed by it thought alcohol had meant to them.”

The result is a lyrical and introspective attempt to better understand these writers, and an poignant examination of addiction's parasitic connection to creativity—how is that alcohol can inspire writers even as it gnaws away at them? There are no easy answers here. But reading Laing's book is like floating slowly down a meandering river. It's best if you just let yourself be carried along.

(PS: if you’re curious about the title, it comes from a line in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. ‘Echo Spring’ is a nickname for a liquor cabinet.)
 


My Favourite Book of 2014, Larisa Sviridova

by Larisa
December 03, 2014

If you are invited to someone’s house for the first time do you ever catch yourself picking through your host’s bookshelves and subconsciously judging their taste based on the selection of books on those shelves? I’ve done it! Even though reading preferences cannot be the only criteria for understanding someone, they could certainly tell you a lot about a person.

I enjoy asking people about the books they’ve read, reread or never finished reading. So does Pamela Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review. This is why I didn’t hesitate to buy the collection of interviews conducted and compiled by Pamela Paul in the beautiful hardcover edition By the Book, published by Henry Holt & Co in 2014. This book includes interviews with sixty-five interesting personalities such as writers David Mitchell, Jhumpa Lahiri, J.K.Rowling, John Grisham, Khaled Hosseini, John Irving, actors such as Emma Thompson or Arnold Schwarzenegger, and singers like Sting. It is fascinating to learn their reading preferences, their likes and dislikes, and the books which have had the greatest impact on them as individuals and professionals.

I learned that Jane Eyre remains a favorite literary character for Amy Tan; that of all the people in the world, Malcolm Gladwell would prefer to meet Shakespeare’s wife; that Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland had the greatest impact on Joyce Carol Oates; that James McBride has never read “the great Russian writers”; that the first and last horror book Dan Brown has ever opened was The Exorcist and that Sting is absolutely ignorant of self-help books. Oh! And Nicholson Baker likes reading diaries.

Even a devoted reader might have a few titles which they consider as “guilty pleasures” or a book, which would be just so alien, that it feels like they don’t belong to one’s shelf. Imagine writers have those too!

You will feel better if you know that there are books everybody is supposed to like, but the writers didn’t; or books everyone had read in the childhood but famous people did not. And of course, some celebrities might also have secrets: “Nothing can be compared to the excitement of a forbidden book”, admits Isabel Allende, who “discovered the irresistible mixture of eroticism and fantasy reading One Thousand and One Nights inside a closet with a flashlight”.

I wasn’t familiar with all the writers in this collection, even less so with the books they talk about. Needless to say, I now have a long to-read list and I can’t wait until my next visit to the library.


New Releases: December 2014 Highlights

by Dan
Art & Photography + Fiction + Food & Drink + Reference / November 27, 2014

Thoughts may already be turning to Christmas, but here are a few of next month's new releases from Raincoast Books: 

FICTION

Another Night, Another Day

Sarah Rayner

Three people, each crying out for help.

There's Karen, about to lose her father; Abby, whose son has autism and needs constant care, and Michael, a family man on the verge of bankruptcy. As each sinks under the strain, they're brought together at Moreland's Clinic.

From the international bestselling author, Sarah Rayner, Another Night, Another Day is the emotional story of a group of strangers who come together to heal, creating lifelong friendships along the way.

 

 

Available December 23


Saving Grace

Jane Green

From the New York Times bestselling author of Tempting Fate comes a powerful and riveting novel about a woman whose life begins to unravel in the face of infidelity and addiction.

Grace and Ted Chapman are widely regarded as the perfect literary power couple. Ted is a successful novelist and Grace, his wife of twenty years, is beautiful, stylish, carefree, and a wonderful homemaker. But what no one sees, what is churning under the surface, is Ted's rages. His mood swings. And the precarious house of cards that their lifestyle is built upon. 

Saving Grace will have you on the edge of your seat as you follow Grace on her harrowing journey to rock bottom and back.

 

Available December 30


 

NONFICTION

TRAVEL

Paris in Love

Nichole Robertson

A pair of scarlet-rimmed coffee cups, two glasses of Bordeaux, light glowing rosily from a street lamp, a bouquet of bright red flowers-Nichole Robertson's follow-up to the beloved Paris in Color captures the hidden corners and secret moments that make Paris the most romantic city in the world. A love letter in rouge to the City of Light, Paris in Love is the perfect valentine for anyone who adores Paris!

 

Available December 2


PHOTOGRAPHY

Melting Away 

Images of the Arctic and Antarctic

Camille Seaman

For ten years Camille Seaman has documented the rapidly changing landscapes of Earth's polar regions. As an expedition photographer aboard small ships in the Arctic and Antarctic, she has chronicled the accelerating effects of global warming on the jagged face of nearly fifty thousand icebergs. Through Seaman's lens, each towering chunk of ice takes on a distinct personality, giving her work the feel of majestic portraiture. 

Available December 2


TECHNOLOGY

Pogue's Basics

Essential Tips and Shortcuts (That No One Bothers to Tell You) for Simplifying the Technology in Your Life

David Pogue

Did you know that can you scroll a Web page just by tapping the space bar? How do you recover photos you've deleted by accident? What can you do if your cell phone's battery is dead by dinnertime each day?

When it comes to technology, there's no driver's ed class or government-issued pamphlet covering the essentials. Somehow, you're just supposed to know how to use your phone, tablet, computer, camera, Web browser, e-mail, and social networks. Luckily, award-winning tech expert David Pogue comes to the rescue with Pogue's Basics, a book that will change your relationship with all of the technology in your life.

Available December 9


FOOD & DRINK

New in Paperback

Crazy Sexy Kitchen

150 Plant-Empowered Recipes to Ignite a Mouthwatering Revolution

Kris Carr and Chad Sarno

In Crazy Sexy Kitchen, the woman who made prevention hot is now making it delicious! In her new book, New York Times best-selling author Kris Carr gives us a Veggie Manifesto for gourmands and novices alike, and it's filled with inspiration, education, and cooking tips-plus more than 150 nourishing, nosh-worthy recipes. 

 

Available December 9


New Releases: November 2014 Highlights

by Dan
Design & Typography + Fiction + Film + Health & Wellness + Travel / November 07, 2014

I refuse to discuss Christmas yet, so here are just some of the new (non-festive) books available this month from Raincoast Books! 

FICTION

The Three-Body Problem

Cixin Liu

With the scope of Dune and the commercial action of Independence Day, this near-future trilogy is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multiple-award-winning phenomenon from China's most beloved science fiction author.

Set against the backdrop of China's Cultural Revolution, a secret military project sends signals into space to establish contact with aliens. An alien civilization on the brink of destruction captures the signal and plans to invade Earth. Meanwhile, on Earth, different camps start forming, planning to either welcome the superior beings and help them take over a world seen as corrupt, or to fight against the invasion. The result is a science fiction masterpiece of enormous scope and vision.

Available November 11


THRILLERS

Sons of Anarchy: Bratva

Christopher Golden

With half of the club recently released from Stockton State Penitentiary, and the Galindo drug cartel bringing down heat at every turn, the MC already has its hands full. Yet Jax Teller the V.P. of SAMCRO has another problem to deal with. He just learned that his Irish half-sister Trinity has been in the U.S. for months entangled with Russian BRATVA gangsters. Now that she's abruptly gone missing, he's sure the brewing mafia war is connected to her disappearance. Jax heads to Nevada with Chibs and Opie to search for her and seek revenge. Trinity may be half-Irish, but she's also half-Teller and where Teller's go, trouble follows.

Available November 11


Betrayed

A Rosato & DiNunzio Novel

Lisa Scottoline

Judy Carrier finds herself at a crossroads in her life. Her best friend, Mary DiNunzio, has just become partner and is about to become a bride, leaving Judy vaguely out of sorts. To make matters worse, she is shocked to discover that her beloved Aunt Vicky has been diagnosed with breast cancer. She races to her aunt's side, and so does Judy's mother, only to find that her aunt is dealing with the sudden death of a friend who had been helping her through chemo. The friend, Emelia Juarez, was an undocumented worker at a local farm, but her death doesn't look natural at all, to Judy. Judy begins to investigate, following a path that leads her into an underground world far more dangerous than she ever imagined. 

Available November 25


NONFICTION

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR

Fully Alive

Discovering What Matters Most

Timothy Shriver

As chairman of Special Olympics, Timothy P. Shriver has dedicated his life to the world's most forgotten minority—people with intellectual disabilities. And in a time when we are all more rudderless than ever, when we've lost our sense of what's ultimately important, when we hunger for stability but get only uncertainty, he has looked to them for guidance. Fully Alive chronicles Shriver's discovery of a radically different, and inspiring, way of life. We see straight into the lives of those who seem powerless but who have turned that into a power of their own, and through them learn that we are all totally vulnerable and totally valuable at the same time.

Available November 11


DESIGN

Beautiful Users

Designing for People

Edited by Ellen Lupton

In the mid-twentieth century, Henry Dreyfuss—widely considered the father of industrial design—pioneered a user-centered approach to design that focuses on studying people's behaviours and attitudes as a key first step in developing successful products. In the intervening years, user-centered design has expanded to undertake the needs of differently abled users and global populations as well as the design of complex systems and services. Beautiful Users explores the changing relationship between designers and users and considers a range of design methodologies and practices, from user research to hacking, open source, and the maker culture.

Available November 18


ESSAYS

The Unspeakable

And Other Subjects of Discussion

Meghan Daum

In her celebrated 2001 collection, My Misspent Youth, Meghan Daum offered a bold, witty, defining account of the artistic ambitions, financial anxieties, and mixed emotions of her generation. The Unspeakable is an equally bold and witty, but also a sadder and wiser, report from early middle age.

Combining the piercing insight of Joan Didion with a warm humor reminiscent of Nora Ephron, Daum dissects our culture's most dangerous illusions, blind spots, and sentimentalities while retaining her own joy and compassion. Through it all, she dramatizes the search for an authentic self in a world where achieving an identity is never simple and never complete.

Available November 18


Men 

Notes from an Ongoing Investigation

Laura Kipnis

It's no secret that men often behave in confusing ways, but in recent years we've witnessed so many spectacular public displays of male excess-disgraced politicians, erotically desperate professors, fallen sports heroes-that we're left to wonder whether something has come unwired in the collective male psyche.

In the essays collected here, Kipnis revisits the archetypes of wayward masculinity that have captured her imagination over the years: the scumbag, the con man, the lothario, the obsessive, cheaters, gropers, self-deceivers, and many others.

Available November 18


FOOD & DRINK

Bar Tartine

Techniques and Recipes

Cortney Burns and Nick Balla with Jan Newberry

Bar Tartine—co-founded by Tartine Bakery's Chad Robertson and Elisabeth Prueitt—is obsessed over by locals and visitors, critics and chefs. Helmed by Nick Balla and Cortney Burns, it draws on time-honoured processes, and a core that runs through the cuisines of Central Europe, Japan, and Scandinavia to deliver a range of dishes from soups to salads, to shared plates and sweets. With more than 150 photographs, this highly anticipated cookbook is a true original.

Available November 25


HEALTH & FITNESS

Make Your Own Rules Diet 

Tara Stiles

In Make Your Own Rules Diet, Tara Stiles introduces readers to easy and fun ways to bring yoga, meditation, and healthy food into their lives. As the designer and face of Reebok's first yoga lifestyle line, author of Slim, Calm, Sexy Yoga, and the founder of Strala—the movement-based system that ignites freedom, known for its laid-back and unpretentious vibe—Tara has long been a proponent of creating a tension-free healthy life by tapping into the unique needs of her clients. In this new book, she teaches readers how to apply this inward-looking philosophy to themselves.

Available October 15


HUMOUR

Texts From Jane Eyre

And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters

Mallory Ortberg

Hilariously imagined text conversations—the passive aggressive, the clever, and the strange—from classic and modern literary figures, from Scarlett O'Hara to Jessica Wakefield. Texts from Jane Eyre is a witty, irreverent mash-up that brings the characters from your favourite books into the twenty-first century.

 

 

Available Now


MUSIC

Mark Motherbaugh: Myopia 

Adam Lerner

Mark Mothersbaugh is a legendary figure for fans of both street art and music culture. Co-founder of the seminal New Wave band DEVO, he was a prolific visual artist before the band's inception moving seamlessly between multiple mediums creating bold, cartoonish, strangely disturbed works of pop surrealism that playfully explore the relationship between technology and individuality. In the most comprehensive presentation of his work to date, Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia features a lifetime of his creative inventions from the beginning of his artistic career in the 1970s to his most recent work.

Available Now


Blue Note: Uncompromising Expression

75 Years of the Finest in Jazz

Richard Havers

Published for Blue Note's seventy-fifth anniversary, this landmark volume is the first official illustrated story of the legendary jazz label, from 1939 roots to its renaissance today. Featuring classic album artwork, unseen contact sheets, rare ephemera from the Blue Note Archives, commentary from some of the biggest names in jazz today, and feature reviews of seventy-five key albums, this is the definitive book on the legendary label.

 

Available November 14


POPULAR CULTURE

A Year in the Life of Downton Abbey

Seasonal Celebrations, Traditions, and Recipes

Jessica Fellowes; foreword by Julian Fellowes

This gorgeous book explores the seasonal events and celebrations of the great estate—including house parties, debutantes, the London Season, yearly trips to Scotland, the sporting season, and, of course, the cherished rituals of Christmas. Jessica Fellowes and the creative team behind Downton Abbey invite us to peer through the prism of the house as we learn more about the lives of our favorite characters, the actors who play them, and those who bring this exquisite world to real life.

Available Now


Inside HBO's Game of Thrones #2

Seasons 3 & 4

C.A. Taylor

Each episode of HBO's Game of Thrones draws millions of obsessed viewers who revel in the shocking plot twists, award-winning performances, and gorgeously rendered fantasy world. This official companion book reveals what it takes to translate George R. R. Martin's bestselling series into a wildly popular television series. With unprecedented scope and depth, it showcases hundreds of unpublished set photos, visual effects art, and production and costume designs, plus insights from key actors and crew members that capture the best scripted and unscripted moments from Seasons 3 and 4.

Available November 11


TRAVEL

 

The World

Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet has taken the highlights from the world's best guidebooks and put them together into one 960-page whopper to create the ultimate guide to Earth.

This user-friendly A-Z gives a flavour of each country in the world, including a map, travel highlights, info on where to go and how to get around, as well as some quirkier details to bring each place to life. In Lonely Planet's trademark blue-spine format, this is the ultimate planning resource. From now on, every traveller's journey should start here…

 

Available Now


Hervé Tullet in Toronto October 8, 2014!

by Dan
Events + Kids / October 02, 2014

Mix It Up with Herve Tullet

Join Small Print Toronto in conjunction with Chronicle Books, the Avenue Road Arts School and Mabel's Fables on October 8th for a live event for kids with artist Hervé Tullet, the New York Times bestselling author of Press Here and Mix It Up!

Mix It Up! A Live Art Event for Kids 3-7 with Hervé Tullet
October 8 4:00PM - 5:00PM
The Great Hall

1087 Queen Street West
> Toronto, ON M6J 1H3
Tel: 647-341-5526

For FREE tickets go to: www.smallprinttoronto.org


New Releases: October 2014 Highlights

by Dan
Fiction + Food & Drink + Spirituality + Travel / October 01, 2014

Here are just a few of the new books available from Raincoast Books in October! 

FICTION

An Irish Doctor in Peace and at War 

An Irish Country Novel

Patrick Taylor

Doctor O'Reilly heeds the call to serve his country the new novel in Patrick Taylor's beloved Irish Country series. Shifting deftly between two very different eras, An Irish Doctor in Peace and At War reveals more about O'Reilly's tumultuous past, even as Ballybucklebo faces the future in its own singular fashion. 

 

Available October 14


HORROR

Robert Kirkman's The Walking Dead: Descent

Jay Bonansinga

Written by Jay Bonansinga, based on the original series created by Robert Kirkman, The Walking Dead: Descent follows the events of The Fall of the Governor (book one and two), and Lilly Caul's struggles to rebuild Woodbury after the Governor's shocking demise.

The Governor's legacy of madness haunts every nook and cranny of this little walled community, but Lilly and a small ragtag band of survivors are determined to overcome their traumatic past… despite the fact that a super-herd is closing in on them.

Available October 14


NONFICTION

BIOGRAPHY

Seven Letters from Paris

A Memoir

Samantha Verant

At age 40, Samantha Verant's life is falling apart—she's jobless, in debt, and feeling stuck… until she stumbles upon seven old love letters from Jean-Luc, the sexy Frenchman she'd met in Paris when she was 19. With a quick Google search, she finds him, and both are quick to realize that the passion they felt 20 years prior hasn't faded with time and distance.

Samantha knows that jetting off to France to reconnect with a man that she only knew for one sun-drenched, passion-filled day is crazy—but it's the kind of crazy she's been waiting for her whole life...

Available October 15


Limonov

The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia

Emmanuel Carrère

Eduard Limonov isn't fictional—but he might as well be. This pseudobiography isn't a novel, but it reads like one: from Limonov's grim childhood to his desperate, comical, ultimately successful attempts to gain the respect of Russia's literary intellectual elite; to his immigration to New York, then to Paris; to his return to the motherland. Limonov could be read as a charming picaresque. But it could also be read as a troubling counternarrative of the second half of the twentieth century, one that reveals a violence, an anarchy, a brutality, that the stories we tell ourselves about progress tend to conceal.

Available October 21


CREATIVITY

Syllabus 

Notes From an Accidental Professor

Lynda Barry

The award-winning author Lynda Barry is the creative force behind the genre-defying and bestselling work What It Is. For the past decade, Barry has run a highly popular writing workshop for nonwriters called Writing the Unthinkable. Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor is the first book to make her innovative lesson plans and writing exercises available to the public for home or classroom use. Collaged texts, ballpoint-pen doodles, and watercolor washes adorn Syllabus's yellow lined pages, offering advice on finding a creative voice and using memories to inspire the writing process.

Available October 21


FOOD & DRINK

The Bread Exchange

Tales and Recipes from a Journey of Baking and Bartering

Malin Elmlid

A busy fashion-industry professional with a bread-baking obsession, Malin Elmlid started offering her loaves to others in return for recipes, handmade goods, and, above all, special experiences that come from giving generously of yourself. The Bread Exchange is a book of tales and reflections, of wanderlust connections, and more than 50 recipes for Malin's naturally leavened breads and other delicious things. 

Available October 7


My Little Paris Kitchen

More than 100 Recipes from the Mountains, Market Squares, and Shores of France

Rachel Khoo

The world fell in love with Rachel Khoo through her cookbook and television show The Little Paris Kitchen, and immediately began to covet her Parisian lifestyle, fashion sense, and delicious recipes. In My Little French Kitchen, Rachel leaves Paris and travels to the mountains, villages, and shores of France, sampling regional specialties and translating them into more than 100 recipes.

Available October 14


Calgary Cooks 

Recipes from the City's Top Chefs

edited by Gail Norton and Karen Ralph

Designed with the home cook in mind, Calgary Cooks offers recipes for every occasion. Enhanced with an insightful introduction to Calgary's food scene, full-colour images by celebrated food photographer John Sherlock and short profiles of the featured chefs, Calgary Cooks is the definitive guide to the best recipes from the city's most acclaimed restaurants.

Available October 14


The Dirty Apron Cookbook 

Recipes, Tips and Tricks for Creating Delicious, Foolproof Dishes

David Robertson

Want to impress your dinner guests? Need to diversify your regular menu? Nervous about trying a new cooking technique? Tired of eating alone? The Dirty Apron Cooking School caters to a range of students—both beginners and more experienced cooks—looking to come away with delicious menus and more confidence in the kitchen. The Dirty Apron Cookbook brings together the best of these recipes along with many of the tips and tricks shared in the school’'s classes.

Available October 14


HEALTH

Older, Faster, Stronger 

What Women Runners Can Teach Us All About Living Younger, Longer

Margaret Webb

One part personal quest to discover running greatness after age 50, one part investigation into what the women's running boom can teach athletes about becoming fitter, stronger, and faster as we age, Older, Faster, Stronger is an engrossing narrative sure to inspire women of all ages. A former overweight smoker turned marathoner, Margaret Webb runs with elite older women, follows a high-performance training plan devised by experts, and examines research that shows how endurance training can stall aging. She then tests herself against the world's best older runners at the world masters games in Torino, Italy.

 

Available October 7


MIND BODY SPIRIT

Walking Home 

A Pilgrimage from Humbled to Healed

Sonia Choquette

Within the space of three years, New York Times best-selling author Sonia Choquette suffered the unexpected death of two close family members, seen her marriage implode, and been let down by trusted colleagues.

In order to regain her spiritual footing, Sonia turned to the age-old practice of pilgrimage and set out to walk the legendary Camino de Santiago, an 800-kilometer trek over the Pyrenees and across northern Spain. 

In this riveting book, Sonia shares the intimate details of her gruelling experience, as well as the unexpected moments of grace, humour, and companionship that supported her through her darkest hours. While her journey is unique, the lessons she shares are universal. 

Available October 15


POP CULTURE

Homeland Revealed

Matt Hurwitz

Known for its heart-pumping plot and phenomenal acting, Homeland has garnered fabulous reviews and legions of devoted fans. This richly visual book unpacks the complex show, delving into favorite characters, plot lines, and behind-the-scenes detail, while also examining how real-world technology and techniques inspire and inform Homeland. Hundreds of photos capturing the intense onscreen action complement veteran writer Matt Hurwitz's narrative as he weaves in and out of the past three seasons using interviews with the creators, cast, and crew. 

Available October 14


The Art of Big Hero 6

Jessica Julius

Walt Disney Animation Studios' Big Hero 6 is the story of Hiro Hamada, a brilliant robotics prodigy who must foil a criminal plot that threatens to destroy San Fransokyo. This new title in the popular 'The Art of...' series, published to coincide with the movie's North American release, features concept art from the film's creation—including sketches, storyboards, maquette sculpts, and much more—illuminated by quotes and interviews with the film's creators.

 

Available October 21


Star Wars Costumes

Brandon Alinger

Who can forget the first time Darth Vader marched onto Princess Leia's ship, in his black cape and mask? Or the white hard-body suit of the stormtroopers? Or Leia's outfit as Jabba's slave? These costumes—like so many that adorned the characters of that galaxy far, far away—have become iconic. For the first time, the Lucasfilm Archives is granting full access to the original costumes of episodes IV, V, and VI, allowing them to be revealed in never-before-seen detail. In over 200 new costume photographs, sketches, and behind-the-scenes photos and notes, based on new interviews, fans will get a fresh perspective on the creation of the clothes and costume props that brought these much-loved characters to life.
Available October 28


TRAVEL

Lonely Planet's Best in Travel 2015

Lonely Planet

The best places to go and things to do all around the world in 2015! Drawing on the knowledge, passion and miles travelled by Lonely Planet's staff, authors and online community, we present a year's worth of travel inspiration to take you out of the ordinary and into some unforgettable experiences.

Whether it's thanks to a sporting event, a revitalised infrastructure, a special anniversary or just that aura of 'right now', each destination featured has passed through our agonising selection process to win a place on Lonely Planet's hallowed Best in Travel list ­­—now in its 10th edition.

Available October 21


Conquer Creative Block with Canadian Artist Danielle Krysa!

by Danielle
Art & Photography + Craft + Design & Typography + Events + Vancouver / September 15, 2014

Danielle Krysa is a Vancouver-based artist, curator and writer. Her blog The Jealous Curator receives 250,000 page views a month.

Creative Block 

Get Unstuck, Discover New Ideas. Advice & Projects from 50 Successful Artists
Danielle Krysa
ISBN 9781452118888 | $36.95 pb
Chronicle Books

Creative block is a crippling—and unfortunately universal—challenge for artists. No longer! This chunky blockbuster of a book is chock-full of solutions for overcoming all manner of artistic impediment. The blogger behindThe Jealous Curator interviews 50 successful international artists and mines their insights on how to conquer self-doubt, stay motivated, and get new ideas to flow.

Collage 

Contemporary Artists Hunt and Gather, Cut and Paste, Mash Up and Transform
Danielle Krysa
ISBN 9781452124803 | $33.95 pb
Chronicle Books | 16 Sept 2014

Collage has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity during the twenty-first century, resulting in an explosion of creativity. This showcase of cutting-edge contemporary art from across the globe features galleries of collage by 30 practitioners, from the surreal landscapes of Beth Hoeckel to Fabien Souche's humorous appropriations of pop culture.

 

Upcoming Events:


Vancouver September 22
Talk / Q&A / Collage Workshop
Granville Island Hotel, 1253 Johnston Street, Vancouver
Monday, September 22, 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM   Cost: $10. 

Space is limited and registration is required. To register, please visit Opus Granville Island or contact them at 604‑736‑7028.

Toronto September 24
Talk / Q&A / Book Signing
Swipe, 401 Richmond St. West, Toronto
Wednesday, September 24, 6:00pm-8:00pm

RSVP to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

 

 

 

 


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